Miss Goodhue Lives for a Night (Winner Takes All #2.5) by Kate Noble

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Cecilia Goodhue is a schoolteacher with a past, living with her sister and her husband in a tiny English village. Resigned to a quiet life, Cecilia is surprised when she finds out that her young cousin has run off with a man of no means.

Cecilia had once been a teenaged girl who also fell for a young man’s charms—only to be devastated by his betrayal. Determined to not let her cousin meet the same fate, she heads off to London to but is shocked when her investigation leads her right to the front door of the very man who broke her heart: Theo Hudson.

Together, they reluctantly embark on finding her cousin and returning her to her family. During their searching in London, it soon becomes clear that they both remember their short-lived romance differently and perhaps now, years later, they have a fresh chance at love.

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Publisher and Release Date: Pocket Star, September 2016
Time and Setting: Regency London
Genre: Historical Romance
Heat Level: 2
Review Rating: 3 stars

Review by Sara

Short stories can be difficult to review. An author only has so much page space to have her main characters believably fall in love, so most of the time the plot will move quickly and rely heavily on reuniting former friends, lovers or other close characters. Miss Goodhue Lives for a Night falls into this category and from the description I was hoping the leads would be older and a bit more mature about rediscovering love together. It doesn’t quite work out that way.

Cecilia Goodhue used to be a romantic young woman. When she was sixteen, she followed her heart and ran off with the ward of a neighboring baronet, but unfortunately her father and his caught up with them and their elopement ended before they could say their vows. Her fiancé abandoned her at the inn where they had stopped and left her ruined in the eyes of her family and their small community. Ten years later and Cecilia is still paying the price for her youthful mistake. She has found a home with her sister and vicar brother-in-law but Cecilia is constantly under suspicion that she could act out again and shame their household. Her life now revolves around the community school where she works and living as quietly as possible to avoid any scandals.

When a letter arrives informing Cecilia and her sister that their young cousin has eloped with an officer it seems to them that history is repeating itself. Hoping for a better outcome than her own sad story Cecilia decides to chase after her cousin and either bring her home or make sure that she’s happily married to the young man. Cecilia has her friend Leticia Turner provide her with a contact in London where she can stay and get help in tracking down her wayward cousin. Cecilia knows that time is of the essence to catch up with the pair so she rides overnight on the mail coach to arrive on the doorstep of the Earl of Ashby. Knocking on the front door she is unprepared to come face to face with her past in the form of Mr. Theo Hudson, the man who broke her heart all those years ago.

Theo is just as shocked to see Cecilia standing on the doorstep of his employer’s townhouse. He had only just arrived himself at Lord Ashby’s home having received a summons that the peer had an important task for Theo’s law firm. As it turns out, that task is assisting Cecilia in finding her lost relation but Theo is convinced that his former betrothed is on a wild goose chase. He is annoyed at being stuck with the woman who a decade before destroyed his belief in love when she broke their engagement to find a man of better means. Theo found success practicing law in the intervening years but never let himself get close to another woman for fear they’d hurt him as deeply as Cecilia did.

With only a few clues to go on Cecilia and Theo try to retrace her cousin’s steps or find someone in town who recognizes the vague description they have of the suitor. Their partnership begins awkwardly as neither one has ever really made peace with the past; however the more they work together or discuss the chances of the young runaways having found true love it puts all of the events from that infamous night under the microscope. The spark of attraction Cecilia and Theo shared before is quickly rekindled but it might not be enough to forgive a decade’s worth of regrets.

Miss Goodhue Lives for a Night stems from one of my least favorite romantic tropes of a big misunderstanding pulling two lovers away from each other. Cecilia and Theo were lied to by their respective fathers and believed that they were betrayed by the person they had trusted with their affection. What bothered me about the story is that after these events neither character manages to get over that hurt and it changes how they see themselves or how they live for ten years. Theo throws himself into working and pushes personal relationships aside to protect himself. Cecilia becomes a shell of the exuberant woman she used to be for fear of being shunned by her community or having no place to live. In fact, both characters are very much arrested in their development and it shows in how petty Theo treats Cecilia initially or in how she cannot stand up to the local village women who take advantage of her. It’s only towards the end that Cecilia realizes that she is unhappy with her life but then cannot see a way out of the rut she’s created.

The timeframe of a single day also stretches the believability of the story considering all the baggage each character has to unload. To have them restart a relationship without thinking of the consequences this time shows just how immature these supposedly mature people are.

I know that I’m splitting hairs over what is intended to be a light and enjoyable story of lovers reunited but I couldn’t get behind Cecilia and Theo’s relationship. All the steps in between where they really talk with each other and truly forgive the past are missing or are abbreviated due to the small page count. Miss Goodhue Lives for a Night is a quick read which fits nicely into the Winner Takes All series or as a standalone short story but it shouldn’t be an indication of what to regularly expect from this author.

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