Rebel of Ross by Mary Lancaster

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Scotland, 1156

Malcolm MacHeth, one time Earl of Ross, languishes a prisoner in Roxburgh Castle while his sons raise rebellion in his name. Optimistically, the King of Scots promises the earldom of Ross to landless Norman knight, Sir William de Lanson, if he can somehow defeat the infamous MacHeths.

It wasn’t quite how William’s disgraced wife Christian dreamed of coming home. Capture by the strange and ferocious Adam MacHeth was hardly part of her plan either, although she and William quickly become pawns in his.

Adam, warrior and seer, fights for his father’s freedom and for his family’s right to claim the kingdom of the Scots. Plagued by waking dreams which threaten his sanity and his life, he’s learned to use his prophecies to further his family’s goals. But when he abducts his enemy’s lady, his dreams and his desires are suddenly more personal.

Surrounded by intrigue, ambition and betrayal, Christian must choose between loyalty and love in order to keep a fragile peace for her people and for the man she loves beyond all reason.

Publisher and Release Date: Self-Published, August 2016
Time and Setting:Scotland, 1156
Genre: Historical Romance
Heat Level:1.5
Reviewer Rating: 4 stars

Review by Jenny Q

Traveling to Tirebeck, the holding her husband has just been awarded by the King of Scots, Christian de Lanson is looking forward to returning to the home she hasn’t seen since she was three years old. She hopes her Scottish ancestry and ties to the land will aid her husband’s task in bringing rebellion under control while giving her a renewed sense of purpose in a loveless marriage. But those hopes are quickly tested when she is abducted by one of the very men her husband is tasked with killing, Adam MacHeth, looking every inch the berserker and madman he is rumored to be. Determined not to be cowed, she stands her ground with Adam, who is surprisingly considerate and kind, though it seems even a madman reacts with the same revulsion upon seeing the half mask she wears to hide the disfigurement beneath it. When she is traded back to her husband in exchange for MacHeth’s brother, she is relieved to have seen the last of him even if she can’t stop thinking about him. But of course, she hasn’t really seen the last of him . . .

Adam MacHeth has one goal: to free the imprisoned father he hasn’t seen since he was a child and help him retake his earldom and the Scottish throne. The Norman knight who has taken up residence in Ross is an inconvenience, but his wife is something much more. Her ancestry and rapport with the Scottish residents of Tirebeck could be the key to uniting Ross, but it’s her strength and beauty and her intrusion into his visions of the future that both excite and disconcert him. As alliances shift and Adam puts his plans for Ross in motion, circumstances bring him and Christian together time and time again. As his feelings for her grow, Adam’s desire for his own future threatens the destiny he’s worked so hard to bring about for his family and their legacy. When betrayal brings tensions in Scotland to the breaking point, Adam and Christian both will have to determine where their loyalties lie and what they are willing to risk and endure for love and a fleeting chance at happiness.

I was instantly intrigued by the description of Rebel of Ross. I’m always looking for something different in historical romance, and this time period definitely fits that bill. I loved the inclusion of the history of the period, and the description and attention paid to historical detail. This story takes place at a very contentious time in Scottish history as rival dynasties compete for the right to rule while in England, Henry II is trying to wrestle his kingdom into order after years of civil war. The MacHeths and many other characters in the story were real, and the author has done a good job of wading through some murky history and conflicting scholarly opinions to create a plausible cast of players and scenarios. The characters of Christian and Adam are well-developed, and the chemistry between them is intense. Adam’s family play strong supporting roles, and the intrigue and violence of this era in history makes for exciting, adventurous reading. I couldn’t put it down, burning through the pages to see who would be left standing and if a happily ever after would even be possible.

The only real problem I had with this book is the inclusion of so many points of view. The story is told through the eyes of eleven characters, if I counted correctly. I found myself getting frustrated that I had to view Adam through the eyes of others rather than via his own point of view for the first half of the story. I really wanted to be in his head and get to know him on a more personal level. We do eventually start getting scenes from Adam’s point of view, and they increase in frequency toward the end. I understand the author’s desire to paint a more complete picture of the politics of the time and what was going on in different locations, but I began to grow annoyed as new characters were continually introduced with their own point of view throughout the book when I just wanted to get back to what was happening with Christian and Adam. Admittedly, I am a stickler for tight, focused point of view structures, so this may not pose a problem for other readers. And the fact that I’m still giving this four stars despite my issues with PoV tells you how good the rest of it is!

Rebel of Ross is perfect for readers who enjoy scarred and complex characters, adventure and intrigue, and a hearty dose of history in their romance. I am very much looking forward to reading the sequel!

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