Tag Archive | medieval romance

The Saxon Outlaw’s Revenge by Elisabeth Hobbes

the saxon outlaw's revenge

At the mercy of her enemy!

Abducted by Saxon outlaws, Constance Arnaud comes face-to-face with Aelric, a Saxon boy she once loved. He’s now her enemy, but Constance must reach out to this rebel and persuade him to save her life as she once saved his

Aelric is determined to seek vengeance on the Normans who destroyed his family. Believing Constance deserted him, he can never trust her again. Yet, as they are thrown together and their longing for each other reignites, will Aelric discover that love is stronger than revenge?

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Publisher and Release Date: Harlequin Historical, December 2016

Time and Setting: England, 1068
Genre: Historical Romance
Heat Level: 2
Reviewer Rating: 4 stars

Review by Heather C.

The Normans have recently defeated the Saxons and the bad blood is still brewing between those in charge and those who are subjugated. Aelric, a Saxon, lost his whole family when they were hung as traitors by the local baron, who just happens to be the brother-in-law of Constance, the girl with whom he is in love. Aelric subsequently goes on the run and his relationship with Constance abruptly ends, but years later when they have a chance encounter they have to work through their feelings to determine what – if anything – still remains between them.

There is not nearly enough historical fiction, romantic or otherwise, set around the time of the Norman invasion of England, a time full of so much upheaval and change that it is ripe for storytelling. Hobbes takes advantage of this upheaval and uses it to create the conflict between the main couple in this story. They are from two very different worlds and the place they live in is still very volatile and they must tread carefully.

Aelric and Constance have not seen or heard of each other for eight years.  While they remember the youthful love they shared, so much has changed in the time they have been apart; they have grown up and lived through many life experiences.  Can they get past all of the hurt and the secrets that have built up over time? Constance and Aelric are well-crafted characters; they are multidimensional and one can feel their emotions, the hurt and anger most keenly, and it’s easy to understand how difficult it will be for them to put the past behind them. For what they went through it would be very difficult to put the past behind them. I can’t say that I could identify with either of them exactly, but I found them realistic and interesting. The author has chosen to give Constance a physical disability, but while that makes the character unique,  I would have liked it to maybe have had more of an importance given that it was pointed out extensively early on. The peripheral characters are not as well fleshed-out as the two princials, but there are enough details to give the reader a sense of who they are, which was enough to enable me to keep track of who’s who.

The romance is primarily an emotional one as the Constance and Aelric rebuild their relationship and determine what they mean to each other. Although there are a couple of sex scenes – which have vastly different tones from each other – sex definitely takes a backseat in this novel. Beyond the romance, this story is chock full of drama right from the first scene. There is an ambush, a hostage situation, a mass execution, some spying, and a foiled plot that unfolds in an awesome way. The best part is that none of this felt out of place; the characters still acted very much the way I would expect them to for the time in which they live.

If you are looking for a book that is more of the action packed variety and lighter on the romance, or if you are looking for something set in an oft overlooked setting, The Saxon Outlaw’s Revenge this might be one to consider. It kept my attention all the way through and I thoroughly enjoyed the story.

In Debt to the Enemy Lord by Nicole Locke

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“You have a debt to pay. You owe me your life.” 

Anwen, bastard of Brynmor, has fought hard to find her place in the world. But she’s forced to rethink everything when she’s saved from death by her enemy Teague, Lord of Gwalchdu. Instead of releasing her, he holds her captive…

Teague trusts no one. So, with ominous messages threatening his life, he must keep Anwen under his watch, no matter how much her presence drives him wild. And when passionate arguments turn to passionate encounters, Teague must believe that the strength of their bond will conquer all!

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Publisher and Release Date: Harlequin Historical, December 2016

Time and Setting: Wales, 1290
Heat Level: 2
Genre: Historical Romance
Reviewer Rating: 3.5 stars

Review by Wendy

I have always been a fan of medieval historical fiction written by authors such as Elizabeth Chadwick, and was therefore attracted to In Debt to the Enemy Lord, which I found to be well written with nicely developed and intriguing characters. In fact it was the description of the characters which drew me to the book in the first place.

Teague, Lord of Gwalchdu, is the kind of dark, brooding, solitary character, that often appeals to me if done well – and in this I was not disappointed. His subordinates respect him, but also fear him, even going so far as to cross themselves as he passes them by. With no close friends, his only real confidant is his brother, Rhain. Teague’s innate loneliness is apparent from the beginning; he is in the unenviable position of having a foot in two camps with an English father and Welsh mother. And when these two nations went to war, Teague fought for the English, in the process earning himself the moniker of traitor by the Welsh. The war is now over and they are all living an uneasy peace under the reign of the victor, King Edward I, who defeated the armies of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd (the last ever King of Wales). Much has been lost, and he is fighting an uphill battle in order to win the trust of the defeated Welsh. This has only compounded Teague’s isolation and loneliness further; and even though there are mitigating factors – which are revealed later on in the story – he refuses to justify his actions in siding with the English. He has learned to fully trust only himself, and to a lesser degree, his younger brother.

On a ride around his holdings, a beautiful girl literally falls out of a tree, demanding as she does that he catch her. He does so and it doesn’t take Teague long to realise that his life will never be the same again. Alone and unloved he may have been up until now, but this girl, Anwen, from the neighbouring castle and who considers him her enemy, will shake his – until now – unshakable foundations. Anwen is the beautiful, illegitimate daughter of a Welsh prince and even though Teague manages to break her fall, she still hits her head, and from the description of her injuries and behaviour is suffering from severe concussion. She is nursed back to health by Teague’s servants and his aunt, a religious zealot. He is intrigued by the golden beauty and feels compelled to watch over her at night while she is still unconscious and helpless – holding her hand whilst she hovers between life and death.

Teague has been receiving mysterious threatening messages and is, quite understandably, unnerved by them. He mistrusts anyone and everyone, even the young woman who quite literally drops into his life; although the idea that she could fall into his arms at the exact moment he was underneath it in order to gain access to the inner sanctum of Gwalchdu is rather a stretch. For one thing, the letters appeared long before Anwen comes on the scene and for another, the fact that Teague would even consider such a scenario goes against the picture the author has drawn of him as a master strategist and nobody’s fool.

Once Anwen is reasonably recovered she is anxious to return to her own people, but she comes across as fickle and rather shrewish, quickly forgetting the kindnesses and care she has been shown and constantly throwing the word “Traitor” at Teague. Anwen, it seems, will never forgive what she perceives as the wrong he did to her people by fighting for the English. The spark between them that ignites after Anwen’s fall grows into a full blown attraction once she is conscious and aware of him, but I grew a little fed up with her constant carping and nagging. It is very obvious as the story progresses and we learn more about Teague that he is a good and honourable man. Nevertheless, Anwen continues to berate him to such an extent that when she finally accepts that he is rather a decent chap – I wanted to cheer.

The relationship between Teague and Anwen continues to grow and the author does this very well. In fact I loved her approach in the more intimate scenes between them, which, although reasonably explicit, are subtle and tasteful, with none of the sensuality being lost with the lack of vivid description. But each time I thought that they had finally reached an understanding, she doubts him again –  or when he is more forceful in his authority than she likes – we are back to square one. Misunderstandings per se are not a problem with me generally, but I do get irritated when there are too many or they go on for too long as is the case here.

On the whole, most of the characters are rather dark and complex and I found this novel to be no light, comfortable read; which is not necessarily a bad thing as I like some angst, but I found I was forever looking for hidden meanings and depths which I felt I could be missing. Although this is a medieval romance, the story is rather intense with little light relief which is fine in historical fiction where we are dealing with historical facts but is not what I look for in a romance. Plus on two occasions I was taken completely out of the story when the author used the word ‘centimetre’! The identity of the villain is obvious from the start, although there’s a twist at the end that I admit I hadn’t seen coming. On the whole, In Debt to the Enemy Lord is a nicely written story and I wouldn’t mind reading more by Nicole Locke, but perhaps not stories set in this era – my preference is definitely for medieval-era historical fiction. However, my prejudices are my own and I can recommend the book to readers who enjoy medieval romances.

A Knight for Kallen by Lauren Linwood

a knight for kallen

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Kallen de Mangeron grew up in a convent, her noble family never knowing of her birth. When a new Mother Superior informs them of her existence, they send trusted knight Griffith Sommersby to escort her home.

Griffith’s heart broke when he lost his wife and infant son during childbirth, and he’s kept his feelings locked away from the world — until he meets Kallen. He soon learns her dark secret — that she sees auras around people — which allows her insight into their actions and personalities.

Now Quentin, bastard brother to the king, decides to harness Kallen’s gift in a plot to win the throne. Will Quentin successfully use a kidnapped Kallen as his political pawn, or will Griffith be able to stop him before Kallen changes the course of England’s history?

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Publisher and Release Date: Soul Mate Publishing, November 2015

RHR Classifications:
Time and setting: Southern England, 1293
Genre: Medieval Historical Romance
Heat Level: 1
Reviewer Rating: 5 stars

Review by Vikki

I have read several books by Lauren Linwood and I have enjoyed all of them, especially her medieval romances. A Knight for Kallen is a wonderful example of this sub-genre, reminding me why I love them so much.

Kallen de Mangeron is a child of rape and has lived in a nunnery all her life. When a new abbess takes, over she contacts Lord Crispin and tells him that his sister lived with the sisters and gave birth to Kallen. When Kallen finds out her history, she is excited at finding out she has a family who wants her.

When Griffith Sommersby arrives to bring her to her family, he never expects to find a woman who can heal his broken heart. As they travel from the nunnery to her family, there are a great many mishaps, bringing Griffith and Kallen together as they vanquish their enemies, intent on kidnapping Kallen.

Is Griffith ready to move past the grief of the loss of his wife and infant son and embrace this beautiful young woman who has shown him how to live again?

Ms. Linwood sets the stage well, weaving just the right amount of historical detail into this immensely enjoyable read without turning it into a history lesson. Her description of the dress and customs of the day are vivid, and I could see in my mind’s eye the majesty of the castle through Kallen’s eyes when she arrives and sees it for the first time. The author’s descriptions of the All Hallow’s Eve celebration, are brilliant way to experience what it must have been like at this period of history.

I fell in love with the central characters. I loved Kallen’s innocence and her steadfast belief in God and the way she leads Griffith back to his faith through her shining example. While this is not a big part of the story, it nonetheless sends a wonderful message. Griffith is everything I want to see in a knight – he is brave, honorable and protective of Kallen, willing to give his life to save her from her evil father.

A Knight for Kallen is a well-written novel with an intriguing plot that pulled me into the story and kept me enthralled to the end. It’s a book that touches on the loss of faith and finding it again and I enjoyed that aspect of it a great deal. If you enjoy medieval romances filled with adventure and suspense as well as a beautiful and moving love story, then A Knight for Kallen is a book you are sure to enjoy.

AUDIO REVIEW: The Renegade’s Heart (True Love Brides #2) by Claire Delacroix, narrated by Saskia Maarleveld

the renegade's heart

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Released from the captivity of the Fae, Murdoch Seton wants nothing more than to forget his lost years. Undertaking a quest to recover treasure stolen from his family seems the perfect solution – but Murdoch is not counting upon a curious maiden who holds both the secret to the theft and his sole redemption.
Isabella is outraged to find her brother’s keep besieged by a renegade knight – especially one who is too handsome for his own good or hers. After a single encounter, she becomes convinced that his cause is just and decides to unveil the true thief, never imagining that their single shared kiss has launched a battle for Murdoch’s very soul. As the treacherous Fae move to claim Murdoch forever, Isabella seeks to heal the knight who has stolen her heart. But will Murdoch allow her to take a risk and endanger herself? Or will he sacrifice himself to ensure Isabella’s future?

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Publisher and Release Date: Deborah A. Cooke Publishing, September 2015

RHR Classifications:
Time and Setting: Medieval Scotland
Genre: Historical/Paranormal romance
Heat Level: 2
Reviewer Rating: 3 stars

Review by Wendy

I admit that I opted to review this audiobook principally because I enjoy listening to audiobooks, because actually, the premise of this Medieval/Paranormal was somewhat outside of my comfort zone. Initially, I struggled to enjoy it, and had it not been an audiobook, I may not have finished it. But I persevered and ultimately found it to be a passable listen, but even so I had to backtrack a few times to get the gist of the rather complicated storyline.

Murdoch Seton has returned to his homeland after an absence of three years, although to begin with he is unaware of the lengthy time lapse. His father has died in his absence and his brother, now the reluctant Laird, is blaming Murdoch for the misfortunes that have befallen the family. Murdoch, has in fact been ensnared by the Elphine Queen and has unwittingly sold his soul to her in exchange for his short term release to return home to see his family. Unknown to him, his freedom will last only one short month, after which the queen will take Murdoch forever into her fae world. She holds a replica of his heart in a rather macabre orb – throughout the story we get glimpses of the heart turning black and slowly dying within it.

Murdoch is as yet unaware that he is living on borrowed time, but is determined to make amends for his unintentional desertion of his family. He sets out on a quest to retrieve a stolen holy relic, and is led to Kinfairlie where he meets nothing but cool hostility from the Laird, Alexander. He does, however encounter an unexpected ally – Isabella, one of the Laird’s younger sisters. Although she does not believe her brother to be a thief, she does believe he is lying and so begins to help Murdoch; no doubt the fact that the two immediately clicked helped her in her decision.

As the story progresses we see more of the fae, an apparently parallel universe of tiny creatures, living out of sight of all but a few of the humans of the medieval keep of Kinfairlie. While I am not a lover of this kind of story, I can see why Claire Delacroix has such a following – she writes well and with great imagination. And if you like fairies and fae creatures then this story might hold some appeal for you. The author does, however, have one particularly irritating writing trait – she uses the character’s names so often that I felt like screaming; whilst listening I counted the use of Isabella’s name alone sixteen times in five minutes! Once Murdoch and Isabella embarked on their courtship she became ‘my Isabella’ which had me cringing.

Narrator Saskia Maarleveid does a decent job – she captures the honourable, trustworthy and knightly demeanour of Murdoch Seton particularly well, with her slightly husky tones. Her portrayal of most of the characters is good and each one is different enough so the listener is able to know who is talking at any given time. Unfortunately, her regional accents – particularly the Scottish and Irish ones – are very disappointing.

Ultimately, The Renegade’s Heart was just an “okay” listen. I doubt that I will become a follower of Ms, Delacroix, although if you are a fan of paranormal romances, then this title may work for you better than it did for me.

Sweet Bea by Sarah Hegger

Sweet Bea

Is anything sweeter than revenge?

In a family of remarkable people, ordinary Beatrice strives to prove herself worthy. When her family is threatened with losing everything, she rushes to London to save them. Unfortunately, she chooses as her savior the very man who will see her family brought low.

Garrett has sworn vengeance on Sir Arthur of Anglesea for destroying his life when he was a boy and forcing his mother into prostitution for them to survive. He has chosen as his instrument Sir Arthur’s youngest daughter, Beatrice.

Can Beatrice’s goodness teach Garrett that love, not vengeance, is the greatest reward of all?

Publisher and Release Date: eKensington, September 2014

RHR Classifications:
Time and Setting: England, early 13th Century
Genre: Historical Romance
Heat Level: 1.5
Reviewer Rating: 3 stars

Review by Caz

Sweet Bea is an entertaining medieval road-trip story into which the author has thrown a feisty, breeches-wearing heroine, a not-so-heroic hero, a tart with a heart and various other romantic novel clichés and somehow managed to come up with a story I didn’t entirely hate!

Lady Beatrice of Anglesey is the baby of the family (although not for much longer, as her mother is expecting) and even though she’s now a young woman, her family continues to treat her like a child. She’s usually sent from the room when discussions get interesting and it’s clear to her that nobody expects her to amount to very much. To be fair, her parents and siblings think they are doing her a favour by keeping her from hearing stories of the unpleasantness in the world around them, but haven’t stopped to think that perhaps there really are times when a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. The only way Bea ever finds out anything – she says – is when she manages to eavesdrop; and it’s during one such conversation that she learns her family is in danger and that she’s the only one prepared to do anything to help.

She overhears a discussion between her uncle and one of her brothers, from which it seems as though her father has angered the king (John) and that their home may soon come under attack. Her mother is unwell, her brother Henry is unwilling to leave to find their father and brothers – so Bea determines to sneak away and go to London to fetch him.

She can’t travel alone, however, and enlists the aid of her childhood friend, Tom. He’s completely against Bea’s plan – but knowing she’ll likely go anyway, he grudgingly agrees to help. The problem is that he doesn’t really know how to get to London – but Bea is undaunted. She will ask one of the recent newcomers to the village, a man named Garrett (and there’s a typical medieval name if ever I heard one!) to come along, too, as she’s sure he will know the way. She doesn’t know much about him, it’s true, but Garrett is handsome, charming and pays her the kind of attentions she’s never received from anyone else – and she’s very thoroughly smitten.

Tom is suspicious of Garrett right away –and with good reason. He definitely has Bea in his sights as a target for seduction, but for reasons that go deeper than the simple desire of a man to bed a pretty girl. Garrett holds Bea’s father responsible for the fact that he and his mother were forced from their home when he was little more than a child, and for his mother’s having to become a whore in order to keep a roof over their heads and food on the table. He plans to ruin Bea, figuring that making a whore of the daughter of the man he regards as his bitterest enemy will be the perfect act of revenge.

At first, the hero’s unlikely name, the heroine’s recklessness and the revenge plot induced much eye-rolling from this reader. But I kept reading and was surprised to myself engaged by the story and characters, which actually have something endearing about them. As the days pass, Garrett begins to realise that Bea is far from the spoiled princess he had thought her; it’s true that her tendency to rush headlong into danger lands them in hot water on more than one occasion, but she’s capable of great generosity and kindness, too. Her bravery and spirit begin to charm him, and to awaken his long-buried conscience.

And while there were times I wanted to throttle Bea for doing something stupid, or not thinking before she acts, she’s a little different from your average “feisty” heroine because she actually learns from her mistakes and wants to do better.

The story really picks up at around the three-quarter mark, when everything Bea has assumed concerning her father’s situation and the threat to her family is turned on its head, and the danger comes much closer to home. The ending is a little too pat, but I couldn’t help smiling at some of the exchanges between Bea’s father, brothers and Garrett.

What didn’t work so well for me, however, was the book’s execution. There is a lack of sophistication to the storytelling; the language is very simplistic, and in spite of the use of a number of more archaic terms – “chainse”, “braies”, for example – the tone is quite modern.

My biggest problem with the book is the fact that Ms Hegger seems to favour the use of lots and lots of short sentences. One after the other. Which happens a lot. And which I don’t like. At all. It’s a matter of personal preference, of course, but it’s something I find particularly irritating, especially when it happens as often as it does here.

Overall though, Sweet Bea is a relatively quick and undemanding read. While some aspects of the story are rather clichéd, it’s nonetheless very readable, and the way that both protagonists grow as characters is definitely one of its strengths.

VIRTUAL TOUR: Music for My Soul by Lauren Linwood

04_Music For My Soul_Blog Tour Banner_FINAL

As the third wife of an abusive French vineyard owner, Madeleine Bouchard hasn’t produced the expected heir after three years of marriage. Fearing he plans to kill her, she flees during a trip to England. Unable to make her way home, she joins a troupe of traveling mummers and reinvents herself as the only woman troubadour in the land, captivating audiences with both song and story.

Nobleman Garrett Montayne’s fascination with Madeleine causes him to pay the troupe to bypass their next stop in order to journey to his estate. Though he suspects Madeleine of being a thief with dark secrets, love blossoms between them under the magical moon of summer solstice.

But Madeleine’s past is about to catch up with her, as her husband is set to arrive to conduct business with Garrett. Madeleine determines to free herself from her loveless marriage and make a new life with Garrett, no matter what the cost.

Find the book at: Amazon US * ~ * ~ * Amazon UK* ~ * ~ * Barnes & Noble * ~ * ~ * Book Depository * ~ * ~ * IndieBound

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Today, we’re delighted to welcome LAUREN LINWOOD to Romantic Historical Reviews, to tell us about her love of Historical Romance.

I am a voracious reader, recently picking up everything from Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken to David Baldacci’s The Target to Victoria Thompson’s newest Gaslight Mystery, featuring midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Frank Malloy in turn of the century New York. I escape to many times and places—helping Gabriel Allon on a European spy mission, walking the US and getting into trouble with Jack Reacher, or finding political intrigue in the Tudor court with Philippa Gregory’s The King’s Curse.

But when I starting writing the stories in my head, I chose to write romances.

Even though I enjoy catching serial killers or trying court cases vicariously as I place myself in the protagonist’s shoes of the books I read, what I enjoy writing is that Happily Ever After ending. I like writing about relationships—the beginning attraction, the coming together, the difficulties and negotiation of obstacles blocking the way to true love, and then finally the end where two people have overcome everything in their way to unite as one. I enjoy leaving my hero and heroine at story’s end, knowing they will always be together, richer for having known one another and for committing to each other for all time.

So why historical romance?

I was the nerdy, scrawny kid with a passion for reading. My elementary school’s librarian took me under her wing and exposed me to many unique authors, but the biggest gift she gave me? Pointing me toward the biography section. She’d purchased a series of biographies that were only 80-100 pages each, and I raced through every single one of them. Some featured contemporary figures, be it politicians or sports stars, but the bulk told the stories of people from a bygone time.

As I read these factual accounts of once-living people from the past, I fell in love with so many eras in history. I read about Ancient Egypt with Cleopatra and war with the young Maid of Orleans. Benjamin Franklin took me through Colonial America, while I also visited the court of the French Sun King. I hid from the Nazis with Anne Frank and fought the English alongside William Wallace. I studied by candlelight with a young Abe Lincoln and danced with Henry VIII as Anne Boleyn.

History became my favorite class in school. As an adult I became a history teacher, wanting to share my passion for the people who lived long ago who shaped our world as we know it today. I wanted to bring their stories to my students, hoping to explore the fact that these famous people in many ways are similar to us. Sometimes the illustrious names we study are just ordinary people thrust into extraordinary circumstances—and they rose to the occasion.

So what better mix than romance with history? I get to revisit eras I enjoy. I have a blast researching fun facts that I can weave into my narrative. I’m able to share customs and fashions and architecture and traditions—all while bringing two people together, forever.

It doesn’t get any better than that!

EXCERPT


02_Music For My Soul

Garrett peered into the angry face of the woman who haunted his dreams by night and left him absent-minded by day. Their encounter had been brief, but he doubted he had ever met a more remarkable woman. Not even his petite Lynnette had brought such a sweet longing to his loins as did the bewitching creature before him.

Her honeyed hair, loosened from its intricate braid, curled around her shoulders. Tiny beads of sweat had formed just above her upper lip. Without thinking, Garrett reached his thumb towards her and wiped it away. She flinched slightly, her dark, amethyst eyes glowering up at him.

Garrett smiled in spite of himself, offering her a hand to pull her to her feet. He had forgotten how very tall she was as she stared at him, her cheeks flushed with anger.

“Perhaps we could arrange a trade?” he suggested.

She eyed him suspiciously. “I’m not sure if I could trust you, my lord,” she countered.

“Trust me?” he sputtered. “This, from the woman who traipsed about the countryside claiming to be my wife?”

She shrugged nonchalantly, an almost Gallic air about her. She didn’t sound French, but there was an unmistakable manner to her movement. Garrett spent enough time in France to recognize the behavior. However, when she spoke, he quickly put it from his mind.

“I chose a bloody awful name to scare away anyone who accosted me on the road! How was I to know I’d run into you?” She snorted in an unladylike fashion. “I had heard tales of the wicked Lord Montayne, how he frightened old and young alike and gobbled up babes for his dinner. Why, the very mention of his name would cause grown men to plead for their lives and their loved ones. Oh, no, my lord, I was an honest liar. You were the one who resorted to trickery and hid your true identity from me.”

Her accusation so startled Garrett his jaw flew open. No sound came out for a moment. The woman lifted her chin high and turned on her heel. That brought Garrett into motion.

He grabbed her elbow and pulled her around to face him. “Not so fast, my lady.” He studied her a second. Her eyes narrowed at him, but she remained silent. Finally faced with her visage square in front of him, Garrett was at a loss of what to do. His emotions swirled out of control as he spoke.

“’Tis curiosity,” he sputtered.

She looked puzzled. “Curiosity?” she echoed.

He nodded, his words spilling forth rapidly. “I know not who you are, nor where you come from. I’ve dreamed of you since that night only to awaken to an emptiness.” His voice became low and tinged with sadness. “I don’t even know your name.”

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


03_Lauren Linwood
Lauren Linwood became a teacher who wrote on the side to maintain her sanity in a sea of teenage hormones. Her romances use history as a backdrop to place her characters in extraordinary circumstances, where their intense desire and yearning for one another grow into the deep, tender, treasured gift of love.

Lauren, a native Texan, lives in a Dallas suburb with her family. An avid reader, moviegoer, and sports fan, she manages stress by alternating yoga with five mile walks. She is thinking about starting a support group for Pinterest and House Hunters addicts.

For more information please visit Lauren’s website. You can also connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.