Satyr’s Son (Roxton Family Saga #6) by Lucinda Brant

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London, 1786. Lord Henri-Antoine has returned from the Grand Tour to a life of privilege and excess. A vast inheritance allows him every indulgence, free from responsibility. Yet, Henri-Antoine maintains a well-ordered existence, going to great lengths to conceal an affliction few understand and many fear.

Miss Lisa Crisp is a penniless orphan who relies on the charity of relatives to keep her from the poorhouse. Intelligent and unflappable, Lisa will not allow poverty to define her. She leads a useful life working among the sick poor.

Under startling circumstances, Henri-Antoine and Lisa meet. There is instant attraction. When they find themselves attending the same wedding in the country, Henri-Antoine offers Lisa a scandalous proposition, one she should refuse but yearns to accept. Following her heart could ruin them both.

Publisher and Release Date: Sprigleaf Pty., October 2017

Time and Setting: London, 1786
Heat Level: 1
Genre: Historical Romance
Reviewer Rating: 5 stars

Review by Lady Wesley

In Satyr’s Son, Lucinda Brant has created a worthy conclusion to the Roxton Family Saga. This Cinderella-inspired love story features Henri-Antoine Hesham – the younger son of the late fifth Duke of Roxton and his beloved duchess Antonia – who meets his match in lowly but proud Lisa Crisp. Knowing this to be the last of the series, I joyfully savored this book, as I have its full-length predecessors, and although the earlier books are excellent, one need not have read them in order to enjoy this one. The dramatis personae are numerous, however, so I shall try to sketch them out in this review. The new reader may also choose to refer to the family tree appearing at the beginning of the book.

In Noble Satyr, Henri-Antoine’s parents meet and fall deeply in love, with the duke forsaking his debauched life to experience the unexpected joys of marriage and fatherhood with his much younger wife. Antonia and her “Monseigneur” have thirty wonderful years together, until he dies, and Antonia is inconsolable, almost to the point of madness. In Autumn Duchess however she finds love again with Jonathan Strang Leven, a nabob who inherits a Scottish dukedom from a distant relative. To her and everyone else’s surprise, she gives birth to a daughter, Elsie, now a precocious young miss at age eight.

In Midnight Marriage Julian, their eldest son, is forced by his father to marry the very young Deborah Cavendish and immediately sent on an eight-year grand tour with his tutor, Martin. Thanks to the gods of Romancelandia, Julian and Deb meet again as adults and fall in love. Now, Julian is the sixth Duke of Roxton, and he and his duchess have seven lively children who are the apple of their grandmother’s eye.

Dair Devil and Proud Mary focus on the Fitzstuart/Cavendish clan, Antonia’s cousins. Alasdair Cavendish returned from fighting in the American colonies to become a dashing, self-centered rogue, but he is brought to heel by his love for retiring spinster Rory Talbot. They are now the Earl and Countess of Strathsay. Dair’s sister, Lady Mary, is the heroine of Proud Mary. In the earlier books, Mary was unhappily married to Sir Gerald Cavendish, a self-centered social climber who tried to exploit his connections to the Roxtons. Upon his death, Lady Mary and their daughter Theodora were left virtually destitute, with the estate entailed upon the teenaged heir, Jack. Their neighbor, country squire Christopher Bryce, is Theodora’s guardian, and acting upon the wishes of Sir Gerald he refuses to allow “Teddy” (as she prefers to be called) to mingle with her Roxton relatives. True love wins out however when the socially inferior squire with the scandalous past finally declares his love for Lady Mary and is surprised to find himself welcomed into the extended Roxton tribe.

Whew. Got all that? As Satyr’s Son opens, all of these characters, and more, are planning to gather at Treat, the Roxton estate, for the wedding of Teddy Cavendish to her distant cousin Jack, now Sir John Cavendish, MP. As it happens, the groom has been Henri-Antoine’s closest friend since their schooldays. In the earlier books, Jack and Teddy seemed destined for one another, and now it is coming to pass.

But before the wedding festivities begin, we must become acquainted with Lisa Crisp, the orphaned nineteen-year-old woman who lives with Dr. and Mrs. Warner and assists in Dr. Warner’s dispensary. Although Lisa is Mrs. Warner’s cousin, she is treated as something less than a member of the family yet more than a lowly servant. Mrs. Warner is self-absorbed and indolent, while the doctor is kindly but engrossed by his medical practice. Neither of them gave much thought to Lisa.

Henri-Antoine is busy leading a dissolute life in London in the manner of his late father when a drinking bout at a friend’s home causes him to fall into a seizure. He has suffered from the “falling sickness” (epilepsy) since birth, but his condition is hidden from all except his close family and his pal Jack. By happenstance, Lisa is in the house when this incident occurs, and her medical knowledge allows her to discretely assist Henri-Antoine until the seizure passes. Afterward, he visits the dispensary to thank Lisa and is astonished to see that she toils among the poorest and sickest people in London. When he learns that Lisa helps the doctor’s illiterate patients by writing letters to their families, he buys Lisa a beautiful rosewood writing box with mother-of-pearl inlay. (A short visit to the author’s Pinterest page reveals a picture of such a box, along with other wonderful illustrations.)

Henri-Antoine is intrigued by Lisa, but the two never expect to see one another again. Imagine Lisa’s surprise and delight then when she receives a wedding invitation from her best schoolfriend Teddy. It turns out that Lisa’s aunt was Antonia’s personal maid and close friend for many years, and Antonia had arranged for Lisa to attend an exclusive girls’ school. After rumors of Lisa’s scandalous behavior got her expelled from school, she and Teddy lost touch with one another, but once again fairy-godmother Antonia finds Lisa, and insists that she be allowed to attend the wedding.

The romance between Henri-Antoine and Lisa blooms as they spend time together at Treat. To describe what happens there would be spoilerish, but suffice it to say that Henri-Antoine behaves badly at times, and he is a rather difficult hero to like. Some readers have disapproved of him so much that they graded the book downward, but overall I found his behavior understandable, if not especially admirable. And where Henri-Antoine is sometimes cynical and thoughtless, Lisa is kind and gentle and brings light into his life.

For this reader, the pleasure of catching up with all of the Roxton family nine years after the events in Proud Mary more than made up for some less pleasant parts. Because Lisa is the newcomer to this world, we see the extended Roxton family through Lisa’s eyes and hear their backstories through her ears.

Brant gives her readers her usual perfect mixture of history, romance, and family, setting much of the book in the glittering environs of Treat (think Bleheim Palace). So, time-travel back to 1786 and revel in the setting, the characters, and the story.

7 thoughts on “Satyr’s Son (Roxton Family Saga #6) by Lucinda Brant

  1. Fabulous review, LW very succinct. I’ve only just started reading SS and am already champing at the bit to free up more time to enjoy it; your excellent review has only whetted my appetite more! It’s taken something special to kick-start my reading. I adore this family, warts and all.

  2. Thank you so much for your wonderful review, Lady Wesley! I’m so thrilled you enjoy my Roxton Family Saga books, and that Satyr’s Son lived up to expectations! 🙂 As you know, I’ve never shied away from the more unpleasant aspects of a character’s personality when an emotionally charged situation, such as courtship, brings those traits to the for, and never more so when that character is a 25 year old arrogant son of a duke with epilepsy and masculinity issues! LOL! And of course my books are anything but pedestrian, which is what my readers demand.

    • That’s one of the aspects I love about your storytelling. Your characters are real and that’s why my comment read that I love them…warts and all 😊

      • Ah, Wendy, TY so much! I truly do appreciate your support. 🙂 And you can count on this author always striving to live up to her readers’ expectations… warts and all! 😉 🙂 xo

    • You are most welcome, Lucinda. I’m looking forward to the audio version. And to the next edition of the Roxton letters. I’m having a hard time letting go of this family.

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